London’s museums offer "best value" in Europe

But other cultural offerings such as theaters and heritage site drive the average up to make London the most expensive overall.

Read more by clicking the link above.

Creatures biting eachother on a pillar in the dinosaur exhibition at the Natural History Museum, London  (at Natural History Museum, London)

Creatures biting eachother on a pillar in the dinosaur exhibition at the Natural History Museum, London (at Natural History Museum, London)

Close up of the wooden altar at Mauer bei Melk, Austria.  (at Mauer bei Melk)

Close up of the wooden altar at Mauer bei Melk, Austria. (at Mauer bei Melk)

Photograph by Topical Press Agency/Getty and Karen Robinson/The Guardian

The Guardian has a great interactive feature on their website with photos from World War One. If you click each photograph, then it slowly merges into a picture of the same location today. 

The picture above comes with the caption: 

June 1915: a sign chalked on the front of a shop in the east end of London assures people that the business is Russian-owned. Mobs have been attacking shops that they suspect are owned by Germans. July 2014: 170 Salmon Lane, Limehouse, today. Anti-German sentiment erupted into intermittent rioting at the outbreak of war with shops of German or Austrian tradesmen attacked.”

The newspaper yesterday started with a five page reproduction of the edition from 100 years ago as Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife are shot and killed in Sarajevo. #WWI  (at Cafe Restaurant Hummel)

The newspaper yesterday started with a five page reproduction of the edition from 100 years ago as Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife are shot and killed in Sarajevo. #WWI (at Cafe Restaurant Hummel)

Wall Street Journal have an interesting online feature about the legacies of World War One, covering the personalities, technology, language, social, political and geographical change that came about through the war and the world it left behind.

Wall Street Journal have an interesting online feature about the legacies of World War One, covering the personalities, technology, language, social, political and geographical change that came about through the war and the world it left behind.

amyjanebexplainsall:

100 Stories of Migration outpost - fantastic! Hope someone better arranges the panels though! #migrationmuseum #schoolofmuseumstudies #universityofleicester (at Leicester railway station)

amyjanebexplainsall:

100 Stories of Migration outpost - fantastic! Hope someone better arranges the panels though! #migrationmuseum #schoolofmuseumstudies #universityofleicester (at Leicester railway station)

Some #MuseumMarmite responses

The past week I’ve been on holiday, so I was pleased to get back to quite a few retweets and reblogs of my #MuseumMarmite idea. 

On twitter: 

Click here for the full article by Ben Hamley about Australian museums, shifts in how people use their time and how museums need to buck up their ideas and address those changes. There’s some swears, but who can feel passionate about something and not get a bit sweary in the process?

Vintage Vision was quick and definite in her response:

"That bloody Degas Little Dancer. Her smug little face is in every half-decent art museum, and I just want to punch her. I also hate postmodern steel and glass additions to Beaux Arts museum buildings, like the Crystal at the Royal Ontario Museum."

Attendant’s View voiced some concern about children’s galleries, posing the question of whether they:

"…provide a great friendly learning space, or indicate that the main galleries are unsuitable for children and families shouldn’t spend time in them?"

So Museum people and visitors, what’s been getting your goat this week? 

We all love museums, I assume that you wouldn’t be reading this blog unless you at least *strongly like* museums. Nevertheless, we are human and part of the human condition is getting annoyed by things. Sometimes that thing is truly annoying; other times it’s an irrational loathing of something. It could be a serious, well-founded hatred of something that everyone else seems to think is great, it could be that you love something that everyone seems to hate. 
Allow me to introduce: Museum Marmite*
So, feel free to submit your museum peeves and passions and in the coming weeks via the website or on twitter and I’ll put a series of them up. #museummarmite 
* Marmite is a cult yeast based spread, loved and hated with equal passion by the British population. So much so that it became part of their advertising campaign. The jar above has been adapted to include Ai Weiwei’s “Coca Cola Vase”

We all love museums, I assume that you wouldn’t be reading this blog unless you at least *strongly like* museums. Nevertheless, we are human and part of the human condition is getting annoyed by things. Sometimes that thing is truly annoying; other times it’s an irrational loathing of something. It could be a serious, well-founded hatred of something that everyone else seems to think is great, it could be that you love something that everyone seems to hate.

Allow me to introduce: Museum Marmite*

So, feel free to submit your museum peeves and passions and in the coming weeks via the website or on twitter and I’ll put a series of them up. #museummarmite

* Marmite is a cult yeast based spread, loved and hated with equal passion by the British population. So much so that it became part of their advertising campaign. The jar above has been adapted to include Ai Weiwei’s “Coca Cola Vase”

Decoding Anglo-Saxon Art by Rosie Weetch and Craig Williams

The objects invite careful contemplation, and you can find yourself spending hours puzzling over their designs, finding new beasts and images. The dense animal patterns that cover many Anglo-Saxon objects are not just pretty decoration; they have multi-layered symbolic meanings and tell stories.

A great article about the various intricacies and symbols that can be found in amongst the patterns on Anglo-Saxon jewellry. I hope this becomes a series and we get entries about stonework and other objects.
And whilst you’re on the website, take a minute to look at the wealth of other articles and exhibition minisites

Decoding Anglo-Saxon Art by Rosie Weetch and Craig Williams

The objects invite careful contemplation, and you can find yourself spending hours puzzling over their designs, finding new beasts and images. The dense animal patterns that cover many Anglo-Saxon objects are not just pretty decoration; they have multi-layered symbolic meanings and tell stories.

A great article about the various intricacies and symbols that can be found in amongst the patterns on Anglo-Saxon jewellry. I hope this becomes a series and we get entries about stonework and other objects.

And whilst you’re on the website, take a minute to look at the wealth of other articles and exhibition minisites

Another (albeit very succinct) celeb museum review. This time Katy Perry on Instagram and the new Ancient Lives exhibition at the British Museum.

Another (albeit very succinct) celeb museum review. This time Katy Perry on Instagram and the new Ancient Lives exhibition at the British Museum.

A twitter call out for more museum multimedia content online saw @l_brasseur (thanks!) suggest two Luxembourger institutions that have gallery talks, artist interview, exhiibition trailers and the such.
1. Casino Luxembourg (above)
2. MUDAM

A twitter call out for more museum multimedia content online saw @l_brasseur (thanks!) suggest two Luxembourger institutions that have gallery talks, artist interview, exhiibition trailers and the such.

1. Casino Luxembourg (above)

2. MUDAM

Hl. Kümmernis

insmuseum:

Diözesanmuseum Graz, Steiermark

Eine bärtige Frau am Kreuz zählt zu den ungewöhnlichsten Schaustücken des Diözesanmuseums Graz. Zwar nie heilig gesprochen, aber im Volksglauben als Heilige verehrt, nimmt sie einen interessanten Stellenwert in der Frömmigkeit des Alpenraumes ein.

image

A museum in Graz, Austria has a statue of a bearded lady on the cross. For some reason in the past few weeks their website has been getting way more hits than usual…

This coming Sunday (18th May) is the ICOM International Museum Day. It wasn’t possible to embed the map, but here is a link to a clickable version of all the participating museums in Austria and South Tirol.

This coming Sunday (18th May) is the ICOM International Museum Day. It wasn’t possible to embed the map, but here is a link to a clickable version of all the participating museums in Austria and South Tirol.

Photographs, Colonial Legacy and Museums in Contemporary European Culture

"Photographs are probably the most ubiquitous and far reaching records of the colonial past. They trace the experiences of a vast range of people touched by European colonial expansion and domination, both colonised and colonialisers.

"How is this record understood in public histories ? What is its role in the way contemporary European cultures configure their pasts for the benefit of their futures?"

"PHOTOGRAPHS, COLONIAL LEGACY AND MUSEUMS IN CONTEMPORARY EUROPEAN CULTURE (PhotoCLEC) asked what is the role of the photographic legacy of colonial relations in the identity of a fluid and multi-cultural modern Europe and its global relations? It focused on museums and the use of such photographs in museums their displays and their collections as major and influential vectors of public history. The research was undertaken in three European countries, The Netherlands, Norway and the UK, which have shared histories of a European colonial activity, but at same different responses and legacies relating to that history."

Well worth a read with case studies, suggested reading and some really interesting topics.