Posts tagged Britain

The Guardian has published a list showing the most visited tourist attractions in the Britain and whether those sites were up or down from last year. And, it included this pretty cool visualisation from here which can be interacted with!

The Guardian has published a list showing the most visited tourist attractions in the Britain and whether those sites were up or down from last year. And, it included this pretty cool visualisation from here which can be interacted with!

Exciting new project! Can you help?

An open to plea for the highly qualified help of the Museumy Tumblr community:

I am hopefully going to be involved for a short time with a research project dealing with permanent exhibitions, particularly exhibitions that have been designed in new and innovative ways (most immediate example that comes to mind is the V&As British galleries which were designed specially to accommodate different learning styles).

If you have any ideas of permanent exhibitions in Great Britain or the Netherlands that fit the brief, I would be pleased as punch to hear them!


-Some of Britain’s best-known artists launched a campaign Friday to oppose planned government cuts that could slash arts funding by 25 percent. More than 100 artists including David Hockney, Damien Hirst, Anish Kapoor, Antony Gormley and Tracey Emin say they fear deep cuts could hobble the country’s creative economy. Artists including Mark Wallinger and Jeremy Deller rallied outside London’s Tate Modern gallery as part of a campaign that includes an online petition and a video by cartoonist David Shrigley extolling the social and economic benefits of the arts. The flourishing of culture is considered a major achievement of the Labour government that led Britain from 1997 until May of this year. Millions were channeled into cultural institutions from the national lottery and the public purse to fund free museum admissions, the renovation of aging buildings and the construction of new facilities. The new, Conservative-led coalition says most government departments must cut their budgets by up to 25 percent to help slash the country’s recession-swollen deficit. The government hopes companies and private philanthropists will help fill the funding gap, but the economic crisis has already squeezed both corporate and nonprofit funding. “Development money for projects has really dried up in the last few years,” said Beadie Finzi, director of the Channel 4 Britdoc foundation, which helps find funding for documentary filmmakers.
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-Some of Britain’s best-known artists launched a campaign Friday to oppose planned government cuts that could slash arts funding by 25 percent.

More than 100 artists including David Hockney, Damien Hirst, Anish Kapoor, Antony Gormley and Tracey Emin say they fear deep cuts could hobble the country’s creative economy.

Artists including Mark Wallinger and Jeremy Deller rallied outside London’s Tate Modern gallery as part of a campaign that includes an online petition and a video by cartoonist David Shrigley extolling the social and economic benefits of the arts.

The flourishing of culture is considered a major achievement of the Labour government that led Britain from 1997 until May of this year. Millions were channeled into cultural institutions from the national lottery and the public purse to fund free museum admissions, the renovation of aging buildings and the construction of new facilities.

The new, Conservative-led coalition says most government departments must cut their budgets by up to 25 percent to help slash the country’s recession-swollen deficit.

The government hopes companies and private philanthropists will help fill the funding gap, but the economic crisis has already squeezed both corporate and nonprofit funding.

“Development money for projects has really dried up in the last few years,” said Beadie Finzi, director of the Channel 4 Britdoc foundation, which helps find funding for documentary filmmakers.

via…

Songs that were banned by the BBC

It’s almost exactly 43 years to the day since BBC suits heard The Beatles' ‘A Day In The Life' and deemed it too far out for the British public. It wasn't the increasingly experimental band's decision to bolt together a host of different sections, including the spectacular orchestral crescendo, that upset their ears.

What the network took great offence at were the lyrics, particularly John Lennon's supposedly druggy refrain of “I'd love to turn you on”. Nowadays the landmark ‘Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band' track is little short of an unofficial national anthem and no one would dream of criticising, let alone outlawing, it.

But what other songs from the world of rock and pop have fallen foul of the censors over the years?

Via fuckyeahbritain