Posts tagged Photography

burnedshoes:

LEFT: Unknown German soldier, RIGHT: © Paweł Sawicki
A new publication by the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum in Poland shows photographs taken in the extermination camp during World War II alongside pictures of the same locations today.
The wartime photographs were taken by members of the German SS in 1944 and appear in The Auschwitz Album (or Lili Jacob Album), which contains nearly 200 photographs showing the arrival of a transport of Hungarian Jews at the Birkenau camp. The pictures document each stage of processing - from departure from the train and the march to the gas chambers, to the looting of property and the selection of people spared immediate death to work in camp. The only stage not recorded is the extermination in the gas chambers.
The photographer of the present-day pictures, Paweł Sawicki, noted that a detailed analysis of the historical photographs was necessary in order to find the same places and to get to know the working methods of the German author.
The book, Auschwitz-Birkenau. The Place Where You Are Standing, contains 31 wartime pictures, matched to their present-day locations. It has been published in Polish and English versions by the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum.
» find more photomontage art here «

burnedshoes:

LEFT: Unknown German soldier, RIGHT: © Paweł Sawicki

A new publication by the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum in Poland shows photographs taken in the extermination camp during World War II alongside pictures of the same locations today.

The wartime photographs were taken by members of the German SS in 1944 and appear in The Auschwitz Album (or Lili Jacob Album), which contains nearly 200 photographs showing the arrival of a transport of Hungarian Jews at the Birkenau camp. The pictures document each stage of processing - from departure from the train and the march to the gas chambers, to the looting of property and the selection of people spared immediate death to work in camp. The only stage not recorded is the extermination in the gas chambers.

The photographer of the present-day pictures, Paweł Sawicki, noted that a detailed analysis of the historical photographs was necessary in order to find the same places and to get to know the working methods of the German author.

The book, Auschwitz-Birkenau. The Place Where You Are Standing, contains 31 wartime pictures, matched to their present-day locations. It has been published in Polish and English versions by the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum.

» find more photomontage art here «

New York Public Library’s Stereogranimator Lets You Make GIFs Out Of 19th Century Stereographs:

"With the Stereogranimator, the NYPL is letting users transform 19th century stereographs into GIFs, which lets people experience these historical images the way someone in the 1800s might have. Drawing on a collection of over 40,000 stereographs, the Stereogranimator is a project of the NYPL Labs, an experimental unit at the library using digital means to develop new tools for research.
“If you look through enough of them, you start to notice that many from before 1900 come in seemingly-identical pairs. What you may not realize is that these pairs were meant to be viewed together, each side lending the other a sense of depth that a photograph alone cannot possess,” Joshua Heineman, who began a version of the Stereogranimator as a personal project on his blog, wrote on the Huffington Post. “Using stereoscopes, the entertainment-seeking public of the 19th century immersed themselves in these 3D photographs (called stereographs) in a manner akin to how we now view movies, video games or cellphone screens.”

New York Public Library’s Stereogranimator Lets You Make GIFs Out Of 19th Century Stereographs:

"With the Stereogranimator, the NYPL is letting users transform 19th century stereographs into GIFs, which lets people experience these historical images the way someone in the 1800s might have. Drawing on a collection of over 40,000 stereographs, the Stereogranimator is a project of the NYPL Labs, an experimental unit at the library using digital means to develop new tools for research.

“If you look through enough of them, you start to notice that many from before 1900 come in seemingly-identical pairs. What you may not realize is that these pairs were meant to be viewed together, each side lending the other a sense of depth that a photograph alone cannot possess,” Joshua Heineman, who began a version of the Stereogranimator as a personal project on his blog, wrote on the Huffington Post. “Using stereoscopes, the entertainment-seeking public of the 19th century immersed themselves in these 3D photographs (called stereographs) in a manner akin to how we now view movies, video games or cellphone screens.”

The Guardian has series interviewing photographers about what they consider to be their best shot. Haven’t made my way through them all yet, but the reasons that people give and the background to photographs is really interesting and worth a browse.

A collection of colour photos from the US dating between 1939 and 1943. I don’t know what it is about colour photographs from a time where you think there shouldn’t really be any (despite having spent long and enjoyable sick days from school watching the World at War and WWII in Colour with your Dad…), but they have a certain resonance don’t they?
Via Sociological Images.

A collection of colour photos from the US dating between 1939 and 1943. I don’t know what it is about colour photographs from a time where you think there shouldn’t really be any (despite having spent long and enjoyable sick days from school watching the World at War and WWII in Colour with your Dad…), but they have a certain resonance don’t they?

Via Sociological Images.

sympathyfortheartgallery:sexartandpolitics:


Debbie Grossman - Jessie Evans-Whinery, homesteader, with her wife Edith Evans-Whinery, 2010 From the series My Pie Town
In the spring of 1940, Russell Lee wrote to his boss at the Farm Security Administration, Roy Stryker, proposing to spend several weeks shooting Pie Town, New Mexico, a small settlement of homesteaders near the western edge of the state. […] In this work, I take a selection of Lee’s beautifully-photographed body of images and re-imagine, revise, and reconstruct them using Photoshop. The archive I have created resembles Lee’s with an important difference – in My Pie Town, the rag-tag community of homesteaders is populated exclusively by women. In some of my revisions, I have taken male bodies and rendered them to look like masculine women; in others, I have taken pairs of women, shifted their distance and body language, and brought them closer to create a sense of intimacy. In some of the pictures I have created women so masculine, or so ambiguously gendered, that they may not, for some viewers, clearly read as one gender or the other. I’ve also left a few images untouched, allowing for another dimension of re-reading Lee’s work.

sympathyfortheartgallery:sexartandpolitics:

Debbie Grossman - Jessie Evans-Whinery, homesteader, with her wife Edith Evans-Whinery, 2010
From the series My Pie Town

In the spring of 1940, Russell Lee wrote to his boss at the Farm Security Administration, Roy Stryker, proposing to spend several weeks shooting Pie Town, New Mexico, a small settlement of homesteaders near the western edge of the state. […] In this work, I take a selection of Lee’s beautifully-photographed body of images and re-imagine, revise, and reconstruct them using Photoshop. The archive I have created resembles Lee’s with an important difference – in My Pie Town, the rag-tag community of homesteaders is populated exclusively by women.

In some of my revisions, I have taken male bodies and rendered them to look like masculine women; in others, I have taken pairs of women, shifted their distance and body language, and brought them closer to create a sense of intimacy. In some of the pictures I have created women so masculine, or so ambiguously gendered, that they may not, for some viewers, clearly read as one gender or the other. I’ve also left a few images untouched, allowing for another dimension of re-reading Lee’s work.
Interesting website on the history of photo tampering, including this example of Churchill having his trademark cigar airbrushed from a photograph used at the the entrance to the “Britain at War Experience” in South-East London, from 2010.
I think this would make for a great exhibition. Why do people do it? Political statement? Fame? And why is this any different to other art forms that present life-like scenarios but not reality. Does photography have an inherent and taken-for-granted honesty that needs to come with a disclaimer? And what power do people have over the use of their own image (see for example the Britney Spears picture, Kate Winslet, Bobbi McCaughey or Indian star Khushboo) and why aren’t they pasting the face of men onto scantily clad stock photos?

Interesting website on the history of photo tampering, including this example of Churchill having his trademark cigar airbrushed from a photograph used at the the entrance to the “Britain at War Experience” in South-East London, from 2010.

I think this would make for a great exhibition. Why do people do it? Political statement? Fame? And why is this any different to other art forms that present life-like scenarios but not reality. Does photography have an inherent and taken-for-granted honesty that needs to come with a disclaimer? And what power do people have over the use of their own image (see for example the Britney Spears picture, Kate Winslet, Bobbi McCaughey or Indian star Khushboo) and why aren’t they pasting the face of men onto scantily clad stock photos?

Getty Museum Explores the Tradition of Socially Concerned Reportage

In the decades following World War II, an independently minded and critically engaged form of photography began to gather momentum. Situated between journalism and art, its practitioners created extended photographic essays that delved deeply into topics of social concern and presented distinct personal visions of the world. On view at the J. Paul Getty Museum, the Getty Center, June 29 – November 14, 2010, Engaged Observers: Documentary Photography since the Sixties looks in depth at projects by a selection of the most vital photographers who have contributed to the development of this documentary approach. Passionately committed to their subjects, these photographers have captured both meditative and searing images, from the deep south in the civil rights era to the war in Iraq in 2006. Their powerful visual reports, often published extensively as books, explore aspects of life that are sometimes difficult and troubling but are worthy of attention.

Read more by clicking the link above, or go to the Getty homepage.

abbyjean:

This rare photo found in a North Carolina attic depicts two slave  children. In April, the photo was found at a moving sale in Charlotte,  accompanied by a document detailing the sale of “John” for $1,150 in  1854. Most photos of slaves were meant to document brutality. Some of the most  famous, for example, show the scarred backs of men who had been  whipped, Harold Holzer, an administrator at the Metropolitan Museum,  told the AP. So the photograph of the little boys is remarkable  for its mundane glimpse into the faces of children who endured an  extraordinary fate.“This kid was abused and mistreated, and  people forgot about him,” Morgan said. “He doesn’t even exist in  history. And to know that there were a million children who were like  him. I’ve never seen another photo like that that speaks so much for  children.” (AOL)

abbyjean:

This rare photo found in a North Carolina attic depicts two slave children. In April, the photo was found at a moving sale in Charlotte, accompanied by a document detailing the sale of “John” for $1,150 in 1854. Most photos of slaves were meant to document brutality. Some of the most famous, for example, show the scarred backs of men who had been whipped, Harold Holzer, an administrator at the Metropolitan Museum, told the AP. So the photograph of the little boys is remarkable for its mundane glimpse into the faces of children who endured an extraordinary fate.

“This kid was abused and mistreated, and people forgot about him,” Morgan said. “He doesn’t even exist in history. And to know that there were a million children who were like him. I’ve never seen another photo like that that speaks so much for children.” (AOL)


Both the title, and the text, have been extracted from ‘Charles  Bukowski. New poems book 4’ from Fusty Boxes’ Flickr
"then it happened, I got into a fist fight in a storage room with a stock boy called Bobby and he beat the hell out of me. “then that night I got into a fight with a Chinaman and he beat the hell out of me too. “so I took the bus to Houston, got a job in a gas station and switched from wine to vodka.”

Both the title, and the text, have been extracted from ‘Charles Bukowski. New poems book 4’ from Fusty Boxes’ Flickr

"then it happened, I got into a fist fight in a
storage room with a stock boy called Bobby and he
beat the hell out of me.

“then that night I got into a fight with a Chinaman and
he beat the hell out of me too.

“so I took the bus to Houston, got a job in a gas station
and switched from wine to vodka.”

From left: Claude Cahun. Untitled. c. 1921. Gelatin silver print. Thomas  Walther Collection. Purchase; Ilse Bing. Self Portrait in Mirrors.  1931. Gelatin silver print. Joseph G. Mayer Fund. © 2010 The Ilse Bing  Estate/Courtesy Edwynn Houk Gallery; Berenice Abbott. Portrait of the  Artist as a Young Woman. Negative c. 1930/Distortion c. 1950.  Gelatin silver print. Frances Keech Fund in honor of Monroe Wheeler. ©  2010 Berenice Abbott/Commerce Graphics, Ltd., New York. All works in the  collection of The Museum of Modern Art
Excerpt from MOMA’s Inside/Out blog:

In each gallery of the recently opened Pictures by  Women: A History of Modern Photography, you will encounter a  wall of photographs (sometimes two) with only pictures of women.  This is not because women focused their cameras primarily on their  female peers—there are plenty of exceptional landscapes and photographs  of other subjects in the Museum’s collection, and a select smattering of  these are now on view—but rather because I, along with my colleagues  and co-curators Eva Respini and Roxana Marcoci, were fascinated by how  these groups of pictures of women and by women suggest, in their  diversity, the plasticity of both photography and female identity.

From left: Claude Cahun. Untitled. c. 1921. Gelatin silver print. Thomas Walther Collection. Purchase; Ilse Bing. Self Portrait in Mirrors. 1931. Gelatin silver print. Joseph G. Mayer Fund. © 2010 The Ilse Bing Estate/Courtesy Edwynn Houk Gallery; Berenice Abbott. Portrait of the Artist as a Young Woman. Negative c. 1930/Distortion c. 1950. Gelatin silver print. Frances Keech Fund in honor of Monroe Wheeler. © 2010 Berenice Abbott/Commerce Graphics, Ltd., New York. All works in the collection of The Museum of Modern Art

Excerpt from MOMA’s Inside/Out blog:

In each gallery of the recently opened Pictures by Women: A History of Modern Photography, you will encounter a wall of photographs (sometimes two) with only pictures of women. This is not because women focused their cameras primarily on their female peers—there are plenty of exceptional landscapes and photographs of other subjects in the Museum’s collection, and a select smattering of these are now on view—but rather because I, along with my colleagues and co-curators Eva Respini and Roxana Marcoci, were fascinated by how these groups of pictures of women and by women suggest, in their diversity, the plasticity of both photography and female identity.

testprint:

Photography stars in London’s hottest ticket
The Museum of London opened its £20m redevelopment to  the press this morning, showcasing 7000 photographs and artefacts in an  impressive new space.
from British  Journal of Photography

testprint:

Photography stars in London’s hottest ticket

The Museum of London opened its £20m redevelopment to the press this morning, showcasing 7000 photographs and artefacts in an impressive new space.

from British Journal of Photography

(via lavictoire)
Liverpool Museums is running a photo competition to tie in with their current photography exhibition “China through the lens of John Thomson 1868-1872”. Participants have to upload a photo the Flickr Photo Pool. There are some really nice photos - old and new - and it gives me pangs of homesickness!

Liverpool Museums is running a photo competition to tie in with their current photography exhibition “China through the lens of John Thomson 1868-1872”. Participants have to upload a photo the Flickr Photo Pool. There are some really nice photos - old and new - and it gives me pangs of homesickness!